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Beyond Vinyl: Less-Common Fencing Options For Your Swimming Pool

Posted by on 2:05 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Beyond Vinyl: Less-Common Fencing Options For Your Swimming Pool

If you have a swimming pool in your backyard, fencing the area can be very important for safety. Many homeowners opt for vinyl panels because the panels are easy to install and vinyl requires little maintenance. If you are hoping to find a different fencing option that provides aesthetic appeal and fits with your backyard design, there are a few options to consider.  1. Stone or masonry fencing. Stone fencing is one of the most labor-intensive and costly options, as the preparation and finishing work can take much longer than simply erecting prefabricated panels. However, this type of pool enclosure offers some unique benefits: The stone will not be affected by pool chemicals. Some other types of fencing finishes will be affected by long-term exposure to chlorine and pH balancers. Brick and stone fences, however, will not become bleached, nor will they need to be painted. Stone options work for specific pool finishes. If you pool is built with slate finishes, a stone fence made from similar stone will blend seamlessly with the pool deck. Stone fences will also be best for historic homes that feature brick or stone exteriors — they will help naturalize the pool area and make it blend in more easily with the rest of a historic home. Stone fences are sturdy. A stone pool enclosure is less likely to be affected by inclement weather like freezing or high winds. 2. Contemporary glass enclosures. Fencing made with glass may seem to be fragile, but using clear panels for a pool enclosure is a great way to preserve the flow of a backyard entertaining space. It can also be an added measure for safety. For example, if someone is swimming alone, clear panels make it easy for an observer in the house or yard to witness an accident and call for help. Pool glass, like the glass for zoo enclosures or aquarium tanks, is very strong, so you do not need to worry about it breaking. This fencing type is also the most versatile, because it adds safety and boundaries without imposing a design into an existing backyard design or home style. Some clear glass pool enclosures are moveable, allowing for the pool deck to be expanded or for the fence to be removed entirely, should the need arise.  3. Cable fencing. Cable fencing can be a good option if you are trying to provide a barrier around the pool without the need for any strong vertical lines. Just keep in mind that while cable fencing will provide a modern, almost industrial finish to your pool design, it can be easy for children or pets to climb cable fencing. Use this fencing type for deck designs that will be used by older children and adults who can understand that the fence represents a boundary rather than preventing entry. Cable fencing, like glass panels, provide almost uninterrupted pool visibility.  4. Bamboo privacy fencing.  Cedar fences are typical for pool enclosures, but you can have a more unique look by hanging bamboo fences instead. Bamboo fencing is great for privacy because it features small reeds that are knit together for a textile-like finish. To hide any vertical posts, you can hang the panels on both sides of the fence to provide a seamless, continuous finish that appeals to...

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Tips To Make Sure Your Sewer Cleaning Is Effective And Successful

Posted by on 2:45 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Tips To Make Sure Your Sewer Cleaning Is Effective And Successful

If you do not have a septic system attached to your home, then you have a waste system that utilizes a sewer line. Sewer lines are wide and between four and six inches in diameter in most cases. The diameter of the sewer line helps to keep waste moving through the pipe. However, clogs can still occur, and it is wise to invest in a sewer cleaning about once a year to make sure that a clog does not develop. There are a few things that you can do to make sure this cleaning is as effective as possible. Identify Sewer Line Materials A variety of different sewer cleaning tools can be used to clear away debris from inside your sewer line. Some tools can be more effective than others, depending on the type of materials that make up the sewer line. Sewer lines may be made out of clay, concrete, steel, PVC, polyethylene, or fiberglass. If your home was constructed between the 1950s and 1970s, then a clay, fiberglass, or stainless steel sewer line is likely installed on your property. If your house has been built within the last 20 years or so, then a PVC sewer line is likely.  Unless you know which type of sewer pipe was installed, you will need to have the line inspected to find out which type is on your property. Make arrangements with your sewer professional, someone like Total Enviro Services Inc, to complete a video inspection with a fiber optic borescope to identify the sewer line material. Once the line is identified, you should schedule a cleaning with a motorized auger tool fitted with a cutting end if the pipe is clay. Clay sewer lines will have a variety of joints that tree roots can break through. The cutting tool will help to trim the roots away so they cannot clog the line.  If the sewer line is a PVC or fiberglass one, then roots likely will not be an issue. A cleaning with a high pressure water jet will work well for these types of pipes. If the sewer line is a steel one, then the pipe will need to be investigated further. These sewer lines can build with rust and corrosion. This corrosion can be removed with a water jet device. However, corrosion can weaken the pipe joints and allow roots to move through them. In this case, a motorized auger is needed.  Perform Your Own Cleaning A professional cleaning will remove all of the debris that has accumulated on the insides of the sewer line. Some hardened debris may be difficult to remove though. You can make the waste easier to release by using a cleaning chemical at home that can loosen and release some of the matter in between professional sewer cleanings. Since a sewer cleaning should be completed about once a year, consider adding cleaning chemicals to your sewer cleanout about once every six months. This cleanout is a small pipe that connects to your sewer line, and it typically sits close to your house outside the home. A small cap sits on top of the cleanout pipe for easy access.  For the most effective cleaning, purchase a foam drain cleaning solution. When the chemical is placed in your cleanout, the foam expands as it moves down the sewer...

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How To Repaint Your Home’s Aluminum Siding

Posted by on 12:20 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on How To Repaint Your Home’s Aluminum Siding

After your home’s aluminum siding has been exposed to the outdoor elements for several years, its painted surface can become faded, chalky-looking, and can begin to peel from your siding. You can restore the surface of your home’s aluminum siding by cleaning and repainting it. Here are instructions to help you accomplish this and improve the look of your home’s exterior. Clean Your Siding Before you can begin to repaint your aluminum siding, you first need to clean it and remove all residues, so the new layer of primer and paint will properly adhere. If you have any pine or other types of trees around your yard that release sap, you may find spots of sap stuck on your siding. You can apply something like Goo Gone onto the sap on your siding, using a cloth. Work the product into the sap until it dissolves from the siding. Also, applying peanut butter onto the tree sap will help to remove the sticky substances. The oils in the peanut butter react naturally to break down the sap as you rub it into the residue. Next, you will need to remove any bird droppings, peeling paint, mold, mildew, and chalky residue from the surface of your aluminum’s painted surface. The best tool to use to remove these residues is a power washer and a universal white-colored 40 degree spray tip. You can rent one at most equipment rental businesses. This tip provides a gentle spray you can use to clean your aluminum siding without damaging its surface. You will need to use a cleaning solution with your power washer to help remove any chalky residue, mold, and mildew from your siding. Combine together one cup chlorine bleach with one cup of trisodium phosphate (TSP) to every gallon of water, and add it into the power washer’s reservoir. You can find TSP at most home improvement stores. If you have any vegetation around the foundation of your home, it is important to cover it with tarps to protect the vegetation from the chemicals in your cleaning solution. Now you can connect your garden hose to the power washer nozzle inlet and spray the surface of your aluminum siding at a downward angle. Spraying at this angle helps prevent water from getting behind the siding and also prevents the force from the power washer from lifting and damaging your siding panels. After you have removed all residues from your siding, use the same white-colored pressure washer tip to rinse the siding with clean water. Allow one full day for the aluminum siding to fully dry before painting. Paint Your Siding To evenly apply paint onto your siding, it is best to use a paint sprayer. You can rent a good quality professional grade paint sprayer to complete this task yourself, or hire a professional painter to apply the primer and paint for you.  First, you will need to mask around any windows, to prevent the primer and paint from over-spray onto the window glass and trim. Tape up painter’s plastic over your windows, doors, and any other non-aluminum siding surfaces you don’t want primed and painted. Also, you may want to place painting tarps on the ground or vegetation around your home’s foundation to catch any drips or over spray. When doing the painting yourself, it is recommended...

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The Best Garage Door Opener Style For Your Garage

Posted by on 3:35 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on The Best Garage Door Opener Style For Your Garage

You probably don’t think about your garage door opener much. Not until it breaks, at least. Now that it has, you suddenly have a decision to make. There are several different types of garage door openers on the market and you have to choose one. Use this information to narrow your search and find the right opener for your needs. Belt or Chain Driven This is the most common type of garage door opener out there. It’s nothing fancy but it gets the job done. Both types work essentially the same way, with a long line of material between the door and the opener. Lengthening and shortening that line is what pulls the door up and down. Chain drives unsurprisingly use a chain and belt drives use a long strip of rubber to achieve this result. The primary differences between the two will be volume and price. While still less expensive than other types of garage door openers, belt drives are more costly than the more popular chain openers, but they are quieter and cause less vibration. If you are just looking for a basic garage door opener for your garage and aren’t worried about noise, than a standard chain-driven model should be just fine. Belt-driven models are a much better choice when your house extends over the garage. That reduced noise will be important to whomever is using the room right above the garage. Screw Driven A screw-driven garage door openers operate using a giant screw to open and close the door. This is done in the form of a long steel rod, twisted to give the motor something to grip onto. They are known for being quiet and fast, but because of the cost, aren’t as popular as the chain and belt-driven variants. If the ceiling in your garage is especially high, then a screw driven model might be a better choice than the more traditional opener types. This is because a chain or belt-driven model needs to be positioned parallel to the ground at a height specific to the height of the garage door. With an especially high ceiling, you will need to install quite a bit of infrastructure in an otherwise open space to position the opener correctly and add rails for the door. Instead, you can install a screw-driven opener on the wall above the door and have the door pulled straight up into that high ceiling. Direct Drive Direct drive openers are actually just a variant on chain-driven openers but are often the quietest and some of the most reliable. The difference is the lack of moving parts except for the motor. As mentioned, a traditional opener shortens and lengthens a chain to raise and lower the door. With a direct drive opener, the chain is a permanent fixture and the opener moves along it, bring the door along for the ride. It’s easy to see how a well-maintained system could be extremely quiet. These openers are great anywhere you would install a traditional chain operated model, but you are interested in getting something that is quiet and efficient. The same arguments for a belt driven model apply, and you can often add the benefits of a longer warranty to that list. Choosing a garage door opener isn’t nearly as hard once you know what...

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Choosing Fencing For Your Rental Property

Posted by on 10:36 am in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Choosing Fencing For Your Rental Property

If you have just purchased your first rental property, your tenant’s safety and enjoyment is probably one of your main concerns. Once you are satisfied that the interior is safe and in good condition, the outside of your unit needs your attention. One way to increase your tenant’s safety and enhance the curb appeal of your rental property is with quality fencing. There are many options available. Consider these common fencing choices for your rental property. Picket Fences and Wooden Fences These cute little fences provide a barrier to the street and prevent young children and larger pets from wandering into the street. Don’t count on the fence preventing cats from escaping, but most dogs can be deterred with a simple picket or garden fence. They also prevent strangers or curious neighbors from wandering onto the property and cut down on neighborhood kids taking a shortcut through the yard. Wooden fences are relatively inexpensive, but do require regular maintenance. These fences make a great backdrop for perennial beds and shrubs and keep them safely out of the reach of intruders, too. If you plan to landscape the property, a wooden fence can work as a border to the beds, too. Wrought Iron Fences These stately fences give your property a more sophisticated look and are great as a security feature. Adding wrought iron fencing around your rental property increases your property’s curb appeal with keeping intruders out. Like the picket fence, wrought iron fences create a striking backdrop for flowering plants and can even be used for as a ready-made trellis for climbing or vining plants and flowers. While they can be expensive to install, if your rental property is in an upscale neighborhood or in a historic neighborhood, wrought may be just what are looking for to enhance your property’s appearance while providing safety for your tenants. Vinyl Fences Vinyl fencing comes in a wide variety of colors and designs. Some designs even look like picket or wooden fences, but they don’t require the maintenance of wooden fences. These fences don’t rust like metal fencing can and are not susceptible to mold or rot. Choose this option if you are looking for something more care-free than wood, but that still allows your tenants to see outside the yard. Chain Link Fences If your major concern is to block entrance to the area from intruders or to separate your property from public areas, a chain link fence will do the trick. While it has a more industrial look, it is great for bordering parking lots and play areas for kids. Think chain link fences around basketball courts or any area where your tenant’s children play. It can be installed in the ground or erected on pavement or concrete and provides an effective security fence. Privacy Fences If your rental property is located close to other buildings, is adjacent to unattractive views or is close to busy highways, a privacy fence will cut down on noise and give your tenant a secluded area to relax and enjoy time outside. Consider a six -foot privacy fence for backyards to block out prying eyes and create a play area for little ones, or to prevent neighbors from looking in on fist floor rooms. Construction Fences If you intend to do repairs or...

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Dealing With Hail Damage? How Can You Maximize Your Claim Proceeds?

Posted by on 9:22 am in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Dealing With Hail Damage? How Can You Maximize Your Claim Proceeds?

If your home has recently weathered a severe thunderstorm or tornado with high winds and hail, you may be inspecting your battered roof with dismay. Worse yet can be dealing with interior water leaks or moisture caused by a hail-damaged roof — especially while weather conditions are still too dicey to make any type of serious repairs. Will your homeowner’s insurance cover hail damage resulting from a storm or other weather event? How can you ensure you receive all the insurance funds to which you’re entitled? Read on to learn more about handling a hail damage claim in a way that can help you maximize the proceeds of your claim.  When will your homeowner’s insurance cover a hail-damaged roof? One common misconception (particularly among homeowners who have never made an insurance claim) is the belief that an insurance policy will pay enough to completely replace a damaged roof. Like other “wear and tear” items, your roof will be subject to a depreciation schedule — and if your roof was already a couple of decades old when the storm rolled in, you could find yourself on the receiving end of an insurance check that won’t be enough to replace even a fraction of your roof. This is why it’s important not to base the potential value of your insurance claim on the amount a neighbor or friend was quoted for similar damage.  In other situations, your insurance company may argue that any damage to your roof was due to neglect or the normal aging process, rather than a storm that pelted the surface with hail or high winds that ripped off shingles. You could find yourself faced with the prospect of paying out of pocket for an independent inspection and appraisal to rebut the insurance company’s claims that your damage wasn’t storm-related. In the meantime, the existing damage to your roof could continue to worsened after exposure to continued bad weather.  How can you ensure you receive all the insurance funds to which you’re entitled?  There are a couple of things you’ll want to do to both mitigate the risk that your hail damage claim will be questioned (or denied) and maximize the settlement amount eventually received from your homeowner’s insurance company. First, you’ll want to thoroughly document the extent of the storm itself, as well as the resulting damage. If you have any photos or videos of the high winds that sent lawn chairs flying or hail stones that landed on your deck, you’ll be able to more conclusively establish that the damage to your roof was due to a sudden storm rather than ongoing wear and tear. Once it’s safe for you to go outside or climb onto a ladder to visually observe your roof, you’ll want to quickly take some photos of the most damaged areas in case you need to perform any temporary repairs to prevent leakage. It could take several days (or even weeks) for an insurance adjuster to inspect your roof, and you may want to take some remedial waterproofing measures in the meantime. You’ll also want to make sure you’re home (and free) to meet with the claims adjuster when he or she visits to inspect your roof. Being preoccupied with young children, rowdy pets, or other distractions can prevent you from pointing out damaged areas and lead...

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Negative Effects Certain Household Items Can Have On Your Plumbing System And Septic System

Posted by on 3:58 pm in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Negative Effects Certain Household Items Can Have On Your Plumbing System And Septic System

Using the plumbing system in your home properly is not only important for keeping your pipes clean and free of clogs, but it is also important for the safety and condition of your septic system. Normal household products and materials you use can have negative and harmful effects on both of these systems, and you may be able to prevent problems from occurring by learning more about how these products can harm your plumbing and septic system at your home. Grease The first thing you should avoid is pouring any amount of grease down your drains, even if it is just a little bit. Grease does not dissolve with water, and it typically becomes a solid material when it cools. Grease will not only accumulate in your plumbing pipes and cause clogs to form, but it can also damage your septic tank. Grease can get into the components of your septic, including the baffle. If this happens, it can cause clogs with in your septic system and may prevent the system from being able to properly drain water from the tank. Grease does not mix well with plumbing systems or septic systems. Chlorine Bleach If you use bleach in your laundry, it probably will not cause any harm; however, pouring straight bleach down your drains could cause some damage to your plumbing and septic system. When you use bleach in your laundry, it is diluted with the water added to the machine, and this is typically fine for a septic. When you pour straight bleach into your drains, it could corrode the pipes and kill the good bacteria inside your septic system. One key aspect of a septic system involves the way the bacteria in the tank helps the system process solids and waste. The bacteria are designed to assist with reducing the solids that build up. Without this good bacteria, the system can malfunction faster. Antibacterial Soaps Chlorine bleach is not the only substance that can kill the good bacteria in your septic. Antibacterial soaps are also capable of this; however, it takes using a lot of soap to have this effect. This can include hand soaps, dish soaps, and body wash products if they are equipped with antibacterial qualities. The purpose of these soaps is to kill bacteria found on your hands, body, dishes, and other items you may wash. The problem is that when the soap goes down your drain, it ends up in your septic system and can potentially harm the good bacteria in the system. Because of this, you may want to limit the amount of antibacterial soaps you use in your home. Drain Cleaner If, for some reason, a drain in your home gets clogged, you may be instantly tempted to pour drain cleaner down it. This often seems like the easiest and most cost-effective method for clearing a clogged drain; however, using drain cleaning products may not be a safe way to achieve this. Just one teaspoon of drain cleaner can kill enough good bacteria in your septic to cause the system to act up. Drain cleaner typically contains sulphuric acid or sodium hydroxide. Not only are these chemicals toxic for your septic, but they can also damage your plumbing pipes. In addition, they are not safe products to have in your...

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No Control Over Your Climate Control? Try These Solutions To Common Headaches

Posted by on 11:01 am in Uncategorized | Comments Off on No Control Over Your Climate Control? Try These Solutions To Common Headaches

Your home is your castle — or so you thought. But if you’re constantly suffering from temperature or air quality issues, you may feel that your climate control system has taken over as lord of the manor. Here are some smart ways to regain control of your environment. Hot or Cold Spots in the House Legend has it that a permanently cold spot in a home indicates the presence of a ghost — but it’s more likely to indicate inadequate climate control from room to room. This vexing problem may be caused by inconsistent thickness of insulation throughout the home’s walls and ceilings, or may be due to eastern or western exposures that give some rooms an extra dose of thermal energy on sunny days. Whatever the cause, your home constantly feels hot on one side and cold on the other, which makes for an unpleasant living environment. Solutions may include: Window modifications – Installing double-pane windows in your east-facing or west-facing walls can dramatically reduce the amount of heat that radiates through the windows (either inward or outward). Low-emissivity (“low-E”) glass windows have metallic coatings that achieve the same goal. You may opt to install “passive” low-E glass for better retention of warmth or “solar control” low-E glass to keep the room cooler. Ductless heat pumps – Ductless heat pumps, also known as mini-split pumps, are small, wall-mounted climate control units that heat or cool individual areas of the home. This makes them a handy solution for adjusting the temperature in a specific zone, as opposed to cranking up your HVAC system and making the rest of the house too warm or cool (wasting energy in the process). Each ductless heat pump is equipped with a separate thermostat, and some can even be operated with remote control devices. Additional insulation – If poor insulation is clearly the source of your discomfort, you may need to add insulation. Start with the part of the attic that sits over the problem area, since it’s relatively easy to lay down solid “blankets” of insulation or spray foam insulation into gaps. Too Moist or Too Dry One of the principal jobs of a good climate control system is to provide a comfortable level of water content in the air. If your air is too humid, your home may be prone to mold and mildew accumulation, which not only hurts your air quality but can also damage the organic structures that make up the home itself. If the air is too dry, your family may suffer from nosebleeds, chronically dry eyes (which can lead to corneal damage in extreme cases) or dry mouths (which can hasten the erosion of tooth enamel by depriving teeth of protection from saliva). The simplest solution for these problems is to equip your home with a humidifier or dehumidifier. If just one part of the home is too moist or dry, then you can get away with a small and/or portable unit; if the problem afflicts your entire home, then make sure you get a furnace or “whole-home” product that directs dried or moistened air through your HVAC system’s ducts. The Dust Problem Even if you’ve got your mold and mildew levels under control, you may still find yourself plagued by coughing, sneezing and other respiratory issues inside...

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3 Great Benefits Of Wireless Lighting Systems You May Not Know About

Posted by on 11:51 am in Uncategorized | Comments Off on 3 Great Benefits Of Wireless Lighting Systems You May Not Know About

Many people have heard of wireless lighting systems, but few really understand the benefits that these systems can offer on a day-to-day basis. If you are considering installing a new lighting system in your home, or if you have yet to decide on a lighting scheme for your new-build property, below are three great benefits of wireless lighting systems that you should consider when weighing up your options: Easy Integration with Other Automation Systems The widespread use of smartphone technology and the rapid speed at which this technology is increasing means that full home automation is a very viable solution. You possibly already have some level of wireless control in your home, whether it’s an automatic garage door or a sophisticated security system within your property. One of the great advantages of wireless lighting systems is that they can be easily integrated with your existing systems, giving you peace of mind and complete control over your property. If you already have automated systems within your home, speak to your suppliers about how you can integrate all systems into one comprehensive system. This will give you the ability to control your entire home from one place, whether it’s through your smartphone or through a wireless key fob. Improved Home Security One of the understated benefits of having a wireless lighting system in your house is the added security that the system brings. However, these lighting control systems can act as a great deterrent for potential burglars and, in the event of a burglary, help the authorities easily identify the culprit. With the use of keyless control fobs, you can control all of your home’s lighting from one place. This means that you don’t need to be near the switch or dial to control your interior or exterior lighting. The benefit of this is that if you hear a worrying noise outside, you can quickly turn on all of your patio lights in order to scare off any possible intruders. Wireless lighting systems can also be programmed to turn on and off at random times throughout the day. This is a great feature to use if you are away on holiday or on an extended business trip. One of the main things burglars look for when sizing up a property is any sign of an empty property. If you are away from home and your lights are off for an extended period of time, this lets burglars know that your home is empty and ripe to be robbed. By utilizing a wireless lighting system to randomly control your lights or to turn them on at certain times, you discourage potential thieves from entering your premises. Reduced Energy Bills Keyless control fobs aren’t only great for home security, they’re also great for keeping your energy bills at a minimum. Because these fobs can be configured to work with your laptop or smartphone, they allow two-way communication to control your lighting system. This means that by simply opening an app on your phone or pressing a button on your control fob, you can ensure that you never leave the kitchen light on again! Of course, technology is far more sophisticated than simply allowing you to turn lights off. Using a whole home wireless lighting device gives you the opportunity to control lighting based...

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Make Sure Your Tankless Water Heater Will Work With Your Shower Head

Posted by on 10:55 am in Uncategorized | Comments Off on Make Sure Your Tankless Water Heater Will Work With Your Shower Head

Many homeowners either have or are considering replacing their traditional hot water heater with a tankless water heater in order to save energy and enjoy a never-ending supply of hot water. In order to enjoy an endless supply of hot water, though, homeowners need shower heads that will use enough water to activate their new tankless water heater. Some low-flow shower heads won’t draw enough water to turn on a tankless water heater. If you’re thinking about installing a tankless water heater in your home, here’s how to make sure the model you choose will work with your shower heads. Tankless Water Heaters Have Minimum Flow Rates All tankless water heaters have a minimum flow rate, and they won’t turn on if the rate isn’t met. Flow rate is simply a measure of how much water moves through a pipe in a set amount of time. It’s usually expressed in gallons per minute. A tankless water heater’s minimum flow rate is the lowest flow rate that will cause it to kick in. If there’s not enough water moving through a tankless water heater, it won’t begin heating. For example, assume a model you’re looking at has a minimum flow rate of 0.7 gpm. If you turn on a trickle of hot water to wash your hands, you might only draw 0.4 gpm. Until you turn the faucet up to 0.7 gpm, the tankless water heater won’t turn on. As soon as the minimum threshold is hit, the water heater will provide all the hot water you need. Until it is, however, you’ll only have cold water. Problems Can Arise When Replacing a Traditional Water Heater In new home construction, minimum flow rates usually aren’t an issue. Homebuilders know that tankless water heaters have minimum flow rates, and they make sure that the shower heads and tankless water heaters they use are compatible. When replacing a traditional water heater, however, issues can arise. Because traditional water heaters don’t have minimum flow rates, homes that have traditional water heaters sometimes have shower heads that draw only a little water. If a tankless water heater’s minimum flow rate is greater than a shower head’s flow rate, the new water heater won’t be activated when people shower. While this problem can arise with any faucet, it’s particularly common with shower heads for two reasons. First, homeowners that are keen on tankless water heaters’ energy efficiency may have low-flow shower heads that only use a minimal amount of water. Second, showers are often on the second, or even third, floor of homes. As M. Scott Gregg explains, flow rate decreases as water moves away from a water heater. A low-flow shower head that draws 1 gpm might actually only draw 0.75 gpm if it’s far from the water heater. Problems Are Easy to Address, Though If the tankless water heater you’re looking at has a minimum flow rate that’s too high for your shower heads, there are a few solutions. You can try the following: run the bathroom sink when you shower to increase the total flow rate of hot water install new shower heads with higher flow rates yourself ask a plumber to manually lower the minimum flow rate of your tankless water heater after it’s installed If you’re looking for a tankless...

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